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Sonny Okosun poster : Sonny Okosun

Object

Poster

Production date

1987

Object number

1988.31

Physical Description

Black poster with two white triangles top and bottom. In red writing across the middle it says 'Sonny Okosun' and in white text below it 'The 15 piece Ozziddi band'. Event information in the top white triangle in red text and in the bottom white triangle in blue text.

Object history

Poster promoting performance of the Nigerian singer, guitarist and composer Sonny Okosun at the Hackney Empire.

Okosun found fame across Africa with his socio-political "liberation" lyrics. He achieved global success in the 1970s and 80s with the reggae song Fire in Soweto, which is listed on this poster.

He named his band (as seen on this poster) and his style of music ‘Ozzidi’, from the Igbo word for "message", and was associated with Okosun's personal pan-African philosophy of liberation.

Associated Organisation

Hackney Empire (Produced for)

Associated Person

Okosun, Sonny (Subject of)

Inscription

Mankind Worldwide Promotions
proudly presents
The Music for Freedom Tour
Featuring
The first ever appearance, direct from Nigeria, of the sensational
Sonny Okosun
“fire in Soweto” “tell them papa’s land”
And
The 15 piece Ozziddi band
Friday 4th September
Hackney Empire
Mare Street Hackney.
Box Office: 985 2424
Tickets: £6. & £5 concs. £1 reduction
Doors open 7.30 Show 8.00
Presented in association with City Limits Magazine
Design and Logowork: Visual Image
Enquiries: Contact Mankind Club
Printed by Capital Print & Display Ltd.

Material

Card

Dimension

Height: 730mm
Width: 500mm

Exhibition Label

Sonny Okosun, 1987

African musicians like Nigerian Sonny Okosun influenced European artists like The Clash. Okosun’s song Fire in Soweto, which is listed on this poster, documented the 1976 uprisings in Soweto, South Africa. In 1979, The Clash covered the song and recorded Where You Gonna Go (Soweto) during preliminary sessions for their 1979 album London Calling.

Okosun named his band and his style of music ‘Ozzidi’, from the Igbo word for ‘message’, which he associated with his own pan-African philosophy of liberation.

Being African in Hackney: 1960s-2020s
14 September 2021 to 14 February 2022

On display?

No